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Author Topic: Recolorizing, Texture Changing, and Alpha(Google Sketchup and Color Quantizer)  (Read 3322 times)
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windhunter7
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    « on: June 08, 2014, 08:36:56 PM »


    There are 2 picture tutorials I did here; the first one is how to recolor a texture by way of Google Sketchup.
                Get Google Sketchup here: http://filehippo.com/download_sketchup/download/2f2d0bce86e6554b6df98772ca7200a2/
                 Get Tutorial of mine here(Lemme know if the link doesn't work, but it should): http://1drv.ms/1kU4q6X

    The second one is how to use Color Quantizer, with how to use that to do specific tasks written below.
                Get Color Quantizer here: http://www.softpedia.com/dyn-postdownload.php?p=206091&t=4&i=1
                 Get Tutorial of mine here(Lemme know if the link doesn't work, but it should): https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=68BC2F74E7DEABC0%21156

    Color Quantizer tricks here:
                1) Creating Alpha(Transparency): In MS Paint, you can make a solid color(using the filler pain can
                 thing; green is usually best; just make sure that it's a color that's very different from any of the
                 colors in the picture) of where you want the alpha to be. Alpha is when there is transparency in the
                 texture, and it doesn't have to be full transparency. You can then open that up in Color Quantizer,
                 replace that color with transparency of your desire, and save it.(Note that you have to save it as a
                 .png though, or else it won't have the transparency.)

                 2) Replacing parts of a texture with another texture by way of "Shadows":
                 First, copy your texture that you want having a
                 new texture in it. Then, in MS Paint, you can make an outline, using the pencil or line segment
                 function, of where you want to change the texture to a different texture(make sure that it's a thin
                 line, a color that's very different from any of the colors in the picture; for good measure, you can also
                 make a rectangle of a solid color somewhere away from the line that you made; this will help to
                 isolate that color). You can also use this tactic for isolating a part of a picture and pasting it
                 somewhere else. Anyways, the next step is to open Color Quantizer, open up that texture copy with
                 the line segments, and where it says the number of colors as mentioned in the tutorial, change it to a
                 low number that only the outline will still remain identical and the rest will be blurry; if you type in "8",
                 that's usually a good number. Next, "Replace" each color that ISN'T the outline with one color, and
                 leave the outline as that color, or make it a different color(As long as it's not the same color as the
                 rest). Now save, and you should have the outline(and squares that you can easily get rid of, if you
                 followed this step). Open up the file that you created and save it as another file, as when it's
                 created, it bugs when you try to edit because of max numbers of colors; so save it as another file.
                 This is CRUCIAL. Now, you can use the paint bucket to just fill in the outside with a color that is
                 different than any in the original texture, and the inside with the color white.(It MUST be PURE
                 white.) Then, copy the whole texture; open up the original texture(not the copy) and paste it, but
                 don't click anything else yet. It should look like the thing you just created earlier, which I like to call a
                 "Shadow", because it really very does resemble a shadow. The final step is to uncheck the "Draw
                 Opaque" button and you should have part of the texture isolated; you can then copy THIS(it's smart
                 to save it first) and paste it onto the texture that you wanted to add, and save that. You then have
                 both textures integrated.

    If anyone has any questions, feel free to ask!
     Awesome Face

    Here are some in-game examples(And one out-of-game example) of using this tutorial to create CSPs:
    These are the results in-game of some of them(These are all of the CSPs that I made that I'm currently using in my Dolphin build, because that way, I could quickly take in-game screenshots to show what they look like in-game)



    Click the image, and then when you're in imgur, click the image again, to Enlarge

    Now, what the actual portraits look like, here's an example:



    Note that in-game, it's more blended and less sharp on the color changes, making it more high-quality.

    Here's a list of which ones of these were ONLY recolors of existing portraits(Including other people's CSPs):



    Mario
    Ghirahim(Marth)
    Project M's Mr. L
    Diddy Kong
    Zant(Falco)
    Project M's Armored Mewtwo(Lucario)
    Smash 3 Sonic
    Project M's Unmasked Man Lucas


    Here's a list of which ones of these were recolors of portraits that I made myself by looking up a render of a character on Google Images, and then cropping/resizing the picture, WITHOUT any further edits other than recoloration:



    Link(The first 5)
    Kirby(All but the first one)
    Robin(Marth)
    Luigi
    Knuckle Joe(Ness; The first 5)


    Here's a list of which ones of these were recolors of portraits that I made myself by looking up a render of a character on Google Images, and then cropping/resizing the picture, WITH further edits other than recoloration:



    Link(Dark Link)
    Kirby(Dark Kirby)
    Knuckle Joe(Ness; Mr. Saturn Knuckle Joe)

    « Last Edit: March 26, 2016, 06:38:23 PM by windhunter7 » Logged


    Dinoverlord
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    « Reply #1 on: December 14, 2015, 08:51:26 AM »


    I'm starting progress of creating a dark samus mod for smash brawl project m 3.6 beta. I have been tinkering with textures using different tools but my only concern is how they'd look in game, I see that u r taking requests and I'd like to request a favor, would you like to assist me and another on this project? Message me and we'll talk if you'd like to help.
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    « Reply #2 on: November 27, 2016, 06:48:21 PM »


    When I read HD I thought I'd learn the characters shine effect in game. How do I do that? Kinda like the Smash 3/4 characters. Sorry if I'm being unclear.
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    windhunter7
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    « Reply #3 on: November 27, 2016, 06:54:11 PM »


    So, basically, the Smash 3 and Smash 4 characters use a different material than regular Brawl fighters, and that material lets it use an additional texture for the "rim-lit" effects. I believe they have it in the end of the list of textures, and it's called something with "Ref" or something to that effect in the name. So basically, you can export a material from a Smash 3/4 model that uses that rim-lit effect, replace the materials on your model with that, and then just do some renaming so the texture names are the same, and then you can edit the ref texture and change the color, if you want the color of the rimlit to be different.
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    « Reply #4 on: November 27, 2016, 07:20:00 PM »


    So, basically, the Smash 3 and Smash 4 characters use a different material than regular Brawl fighters, and that material lets it use an additional texture for the "rim-lit" effects. I believe they have it in the end of the list of textures, and it's called something with "Ref" or something to that effect in the name. So basically, you can export a material from a Smash 3/4 model that uses that rim-lit effect, replace the materials on your model with that, and then just do some renaming so the texture names are the same, and then you can edit the ref texture and change the color, if you want the color of the rimlit to be different.
    The material? How do I do that?
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    windhunter7
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    « Reply #5 on: November 27, 2016, 07:24:49 PM »


    So, if you expand the ModelData, and expand the MDL0, you should see a folder icon with the name of "Materials"; expand that, and you can click on certain materials, and see the details on each material. Expanding each material shows what textures are attached to the material, but to import/export materials, you'll want to do that without expanding them(Right-click to import or export)
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    Turtle And Guy Productions
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    « Reply #6 on: December 03, 2016, 12:27:50 PM »


    I think that another good program to use is Paint.net
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    « Reply #7 on: December 03, 2016, 03:57:32 PM »


    I think that another good program to use is Paint.net
    I've been using that already, I have gotten much better because of it. What do the materials do? I only get what bones, objects and textures, everything else I find unimportant. I assume they're important however, otherwise they wouldn't be there.
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    windhunter7
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    « Reply #8 on: December 03, 2016, 04:39:34 PM »


    Materials primarily do the following things(I may have missed some, but this is like the general premise):

    1) They connect which texture goes to which polygon on the model
    2) They affect how the model is culled(Culling is which side of the model is invisible; e.g. If you had a flat plane and made one side culled, the side that you culled would be similar to one of those one-way window-mirror things used in police interrogation rooms)
    3) They (somewhat) affect the lighting and colors of the model(The shaders and vertex colors do the rest, though)
    4) They set what Alpha settings the model part using that material uses(For example, if you're using an eye texture that has Alpha in it, you'd have to edit the material to be XLU to allow the eye polygon to be able to use Alpha in-game)
    5) They can edit things like billboard nodes(Making the texture always face the camera, no matter what camera angle), metallic effects(e.g. If you pick up a metal box, you'll see that when you rotate the camera, the texture will change where it is on the model), and other things like that
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    « Reply #9 on: December 04, 2016, 02:55:55 PM »


    Materials primarily do the following things(I may have missed some, but this is like the general premise):

    1) They connect which texture goes to which polygon on the model
    2) They affect how the model is culled(Culling is which side of the model is invisible; e.g. If you had a flat plane and made one side culled, the side that you culled would be similar to one of those one-way window-mirror things used in police interrogation rooms)
    3) They (somewhat) affect the lighting and colors of the model(The shaders and vertex colors do the rest, though)
    4) They set what Alpha settings the model part using that material uses(For example, if you're using an eye texture that has Alpha in it, you'd have to edit the material to be XLU to allow the eye polygon to be able to use Alpha in-game)
    5) They can edit things like billboard nodes(Making the texture always face the camera, no matter what camera angle), metallic effects(e.g. If you pick up a metal box, you'll see that when you rotate the camera, the texture will change where it is on the model), and other things like that
    And to get rid of a model, say MK's cape? That would be done trough the material?
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    windhunter7
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    « Reply #10 on: December 04, 2016, 03:27:45 PM »


    You could do it that way, by setting the material's culling to All, but I wouldn't recommend it, because, since the Material affects the entire polygon(s) it's attached to, and having the polygon still there would make the filesize bigger, so I'd recommend deleting the polygon(s) itself. You can do this by expanding the Objects folder and right-clicking a polygon and clicking Delete(Or, shortcut being Ctrl+Del)
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